Lunch with Molly…

sardines_tin2_0012
Molly and I share similar tastes in that we both very much like roast chicken and sardines which Jenny does not. In a well ordered ménage à trois, as is ours, such a problem is not insurmountable being resolved by the simple expediency of Molly and I taking lunch together whilst Jenny and I dine in the evening. Lunch was until recently something that I remembered from a past life. At one point in that past life I can remember being a master of lunch, which was an event that often filled the best part of a working day. If one was good at lunch it meant that only the meanest portion of time was allotted for work. The inevitable result of that equation has become evident since coming to live in France, a land which celebrates the restaurant lunch with a near religious fervour and where my lunching habits have foundered on the rocks of penury. Mr.Micawber would feel vindicated and eternally grateful that his fictional existence had saved him from yet another person joining the host of spendthrifts waiting to give him a good kicking for being such a prescient clever dick. My return to the lunching habit has been brought about by my recent acquaintance with manual labour. A loaf of bread and a jug of wine is apparently the lunch time menu in Xanadu should you be building a pleasure dome in a cavern measureless to man but, in my dotage, the jug of wine would have me on my knees quicker than a bag of cement on the shoulder or, as P.G.Wodehouse succinctly wrote, being struck behind the ear with a stuffed seal. Speaking of seals, it is apposite that sardines are high on my list, and Molly’s, of lunch time favourites. My Portuguese grandfather was keen on tinned sardines and would use the strange collective term, ” a drop of sardines”, when he fancied them for his supper which statement surprised me, not only grammatically, but also in their selection as food for the evening. The main thing is that Molly is particularly keen on sardines and, surprisingly for a cat, seems to very much like olive oil….as do I. So lunch is simple sardines in olive oil, good bread and butter and a big salad of mache and rocket…..only sardines for Molly. Interestingly, for a lunch companion, Molly prefers to eat from a bowl on the floor. In moments of excess, in years gone by, I often spent a certain amount of time on the floor at end of a long lunch so it’s not for me to criticise the eating habits of others. On the other hand, Molly does prefer to sit on a stool in the kitchen to eat a bowl of biscuits before going to bed in the outhouse.

 

Then of course there is roast chicken…but more of that another time.

 

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About Food,Photography & France

Photographer and film maker living in France. After a long career in London, my wife and I have settled in the Vendee, where we run residential digital photography courses with a strong gastronomic flavour.
This entry was posted in 2015, Art photography, Digital photography, Fish, food, Food and Photography, Food photographer, Olive oil, Photography, sardines, Uncategorized, Writing and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

34 Responses to Lunch with Molly…

  1. Mad Dog says:

    Molly has taken pity on you and gone out of the way to improve your lot 😉

  2. Mad Dog says:

    …and a friend for life 😉

  3. At least Molly eats out of a bowl and not from the tin….standards have to be maintained, you are in France after all 😉

  4. Misky says:

    Enchanting.

    >

  5. Conor Bofin says:

    Lovely post. The sardine picture is perfection. The tale of the companions had me for a while. Very nice writing.

  6. Those sardines! Gorgeous!

  7. Eha says:

    Well for nearly three decades I was the ‘Mistress of Lunch’ during the heady days Down Under we could write such off on tax 😀 !! Should feel guilty I guess but remember the food, naturally the wine and oft awesome company with untold pleasure!! Oh I still exit for Xanadu most lunchtimes even if onesome not having Molly asking to be partner in the exercise!! But Milord, where is your glass 🙂 ?

  8. Francesca says:

    A great little story to accompany such a modest lunch. I like a bit of vinegar on my sardines but I don’t imagine Molly would.

  9. Roger, how serendipitous. I am at Gare du Nord waiting the Eurostar back to London We timed our departure so that we could have one last lunch in Paris. Restaurant Paul, on Ile de la Cité was chosen because 1) it is wonderful, and 2) one of the starters is J.C.David sardines on toast. I have had them before and this time they did not disappoint. I am definitely with you and Molly on this one. — James

    • That’s extraordinary..I love sardines millesimes but Molly and I have the bog standard ones in olive oil…still good…the good Vendeen sardines are from St.Gilles Croix de Vie, just up the coast from us. Glad you enjoyed some J.C.Davids on toast, I shall have to talk to Molly about toast. Enjoy London:)

  10. Your picture of sardines is lovely, Roger. Not lovely enough to make me want to EAT sardines, but still……….

  11. That lucky Molly! How interesting about “a drop of sardines” – I think I will work that phrase into my repertoire.

  12. Oh geez I must have missed who Molly was in the past! I was starting to think Jenny a very patient woman. And that you were being quite modern to mention both in a post! LOL. Gave me a much needed laugh. 🙂

  13. Angeline M says:

    So lucky to have Molly to accompany you at lunch, even if she is on the floor. I am sure she patiently awaits the day when you will join her there after a glass or two of whatever goes good with sardines…maybe a nice dry chardonnay or proseco. As an aside, my father used to enjoy a drop of sardines tinned in oil, on saltine crackers with mustard; he was Mexican with ancestors from Spain. Nothing so fancy as the French way of placing them on toast.

  14. Not really a fan of sardines but I must admit those look delicious

  15. Fucking brilliant.
    I too love sardines (and chicken). The local sardine trawlers have just hit the water this week for our season. I am excited 👊

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